Scripts, Visualization & Production Design

Class Supplement

Living in Oblivion (1995)

The Sunset Limited (2011)

Ted Chung

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Featured Filmmaker | Zacuto USA

Mike's

A Thousand Words

Scripts, synopses & loglines

Podcasts

Misc. sites


Producing and Directing the Short Film and Video

Introduction

Focal Press Web Extras

The Lunch Date (1989)

Crazy Glue (1998)

Ch. 1 — Script

Bambi Meets Godzilla (1969)

Le poulet (1965)

The Red Balloon (1956)


Film Directing — Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept to Screen

Ch. 1 Visualization

"Vision is the art of seeing things invisible”
— Jonathan Swift

Qu'est-ce que le Cinéma? by André Bazin

Katz, Kindle Locations 160-162:

In his landmark book Qu'est-ce que le Cinéma? French film critic André Bazin used the term presence to describe the moviegoer's sense that he is within the same spatial/temporal continuum as the picture on the screen.

Ch. 2 Production Design

Quo Vadis? (1913)

Still photographs and enlargements from the actual motion picture film Quo Vadis, 1913

Cabiria (1914)

Katz, Kindle Locations 272-278:

During World War I several of the smaller production companies in Germany were combined into Ufa (Universum Film Aktien Gesellschaft), a single studio with mammoth stages and considerable state funding. This support, and the magnificent studios at Potsdam-Badelsberg, made technical and stylistic innovation driven by German Expressionism and the Kammerspielfilm possible. These two movements, one featuring fantastic subjects and the other naturalistic and somber subjects, were both darkly psychological and dependent on highly stylized settings and camera technique. In many ways Ufa, and its most important directors, writers and craftsmen—Karl Mayer, Karl Struss, Fritz Lang, F.W. Murnau, G.W. Pabst and A. E. Dupont—set the pace for film design in the '20s, contributing advances in mobile camera, subjective viewpoints and more sharply angular compositions.

Katz, Kindle Locations 287-289:

Twentieth Century Fox look was shaped by William Darling, Richard Day and Lyle Wheeler; Warner Brothers had the gritty realism preferred by Anton Grot; MGM had the luxurious, high-key look of Cedric Gibbons; Paramount had the European sophistication of Hans Dreier; Universal, the moody darkness of Herman Rosse and Charles D. Hall. And at RKO, Van Nest Polglase oversaw the styling of the Astaire-Rogers musicals and Citizen Kane.

Kindle Locations 291-292:

In 1939 William Cameron Menzies accepted an Academy Award for the newly created position of Production Designer for Gone With The Wind.

Masters of Production: The Hidden Art of Hollywood (TV 2004)


Rosemary's Baby — Retrospective Interviews



Interviews include Roman Polanski, Robert Evans and Richard Sylbert

"It's cheaper to go to Venice than to put Venice in a computer," he said in a 1997 interview. "If we start making $200 million movies, the whole thing is going to go down the tubes."
Richard Sylbert, 73, Designer Of Oscar-Winning Film Sets - New York Times

Kindle Locations 420-422:

John Huston began directing at the height of this system, he knew the value of preplanning. Years later Huston would say, “I completely storyboarded The Maltese Falcon because I didn't want to lose face with the crew: I wanted to give the impression I knew what I was doing”

Mentor Huebner

Production Illustrator, Concept/Storyboard Artist

Mentor Huebner Official Website - Film Production Designs - Blade Runner